Category Archives: Earth

Astronaut Ron Garan Says Let’s Set Up a Moon Base First

Ron Garan: "I think we have a long, long way to go to get to Mars." (HuffPost LIVE)

Ron Garan: “I think we have a long, long way to go to get to Mars.” (HuffPost LIVE)

Former NASA astronaut Ron Garan was recently interviewed for Huffington Post’s LIVE broadcast. Ron talked about his new book The Orbital Perspective (read my review here) along with what it was like to be an astronaut and the way his experiences changed his views of life on Earth. (He also live-narrated some of the work being done at the time of the interview outside the ISS during EVA 30!)

In addition to talking about astronaut stuff, Ron weighed in on the human exploration of Mars, recently brought into the spotlight – for better or worse – with the announcement of 100 finalists by the Dutch MarsOne company, which has aspirations of creating the first human colony on the Red Planet. Ron says that while it will be important for us to venture out into the Solar System, really the next logical step would be to establish a permanent presence on our own Moon first.

“This is our closest neighbor, it’s three days away… There are so many things that could be done on the Moon that would have tremendous benefit.”
– Ron Garan, NASA astronaut

You can watch the entire video here, and share what you think in the poll below – should we go back to the Moon first? Or head right on out to Mars?

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Watch This Stunning Seamless Video of Earth From Orbit

Recently featured on Universe Today, this video of Earth from space assembled by video artist Phil Selmes uses actual photos captured from the Space Station, with some fancy editing to create seamless transitions between views. It’s another beautiful presentation of the fragile oasis we call home.

“I don’t see politics, races, borders, countries, religions or differences,” Selmes said in an article on Universe Today. “I saw one planet, one world, one incredibly beautiful miracle in the absolute vastness of the universe.”

See more of Selmes’ work on his YouTube channel. 

Only the Penitentes Shall Pass: Snow and Stars Near ESO’s ALMA

Icy penitentes march along the cold, dry ground on the Chajnantor Plateau near ALMA (ESO/Babak Tafreshi)

Icy penitentes march along the cold, dry ground on the Chajnantor Plateau near ALMA. Click for full version. (ESO/Babak Tafreshi)

I just had to share this beautiful image by ESO photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi; it shows a star-filled night sky above the Chajnantor Plateau on the border of Chile and Bolivia, the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observatory. The site, chosen for its remote location and incredibly clear, dry sky, is one of the best on Earth for observing the most distant objects in the Universe.

The jagged snow features in the foreground are known as penitentes, for their resemblance to the conical hats of Spanish religious group members known as the Nazarenos. They are the result of Sun and wind erosion on high-altitude snow, although the exact process isn’t entirely known.

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Voyager’s Valentine Turns 25 Today

If you’re in love with space exploration then you’ll fall for this: it’s the picture of Earth taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft after it passed the orbit of Pluto in 1990. That image of our planet from almost 4 billion miles away inspired Carl Sagan to write his famous “Pale Blue Dot” passage, and reminds us that we are all just floating on “a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

This is from a post I originally published in 2010. I’ll keep trotting it out until it’s not cool anymore. (Which I don’t think will ever happen.)

Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune as seen by Voyager 1 in 1990 (Credit: NASA)

On February 14, 1990, after nearly 13 years of traveling the solar system, the Voyager 1 spacecraft passed the orbit of Pluto and turned its camera around to take a series of photos of the planets. The image above shows those photos, isolated from the original series and are left to right, top to bottom: Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

From that distance, over 4 billion miles from the Sun, the planets each appear as little more than a bright dot against the vastness of interplanetary space.

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. … There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world.”

– Carl Sagan

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Where Are All of Earth’s Impact Craters?

Impact Craters of Earth by astronomer Thomas Wm. Hamilton (©2014, Strategic Book Publishing)

Impact Craters of Earth by astronomer Thomas Wm. Hamilton (©2014, Strategic Book Publishing)

When you look up at the Moon through a telescope or pair of binoculars you see a world covered in craters of all sizes. It only stands to reason that Earth must also have craters like the Moon, if not many more because of its much larger size. So where are they all?

As it turns out there are many impact craters on Earth visible today, even though millions of years of erosion by weather and tectonic activity have virtually erased all but the largest and deepest. Former astronomer and planetarium director Thomas Wm. Hamilton has compiled the names, locations, and brief data on each known crater around the world – as well as a few on other worlds – and lists them in his latest book Impact Craters of Earth.

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Watch a Beautiful Timelapse Captured from Earth Orbit

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst spent nearly six months living and working in orbit aboard the ISS during Expedition 41 in 2014, and during that time he captured some amazing photos of Earth from the windows of the Station. Watch above as aurorae dance and shimmer, stars and satellites wheel overhead, and city lights shine below from the privileged vantage point of humanity’s place in space 265 miles high.

A combination of 12,500 photos taken by Alexander during his Blue Dot mission, this Ultra High Definition video shows the best our beautiful planet has to offer! (And for full effect watch in full-screen HD!)

Read more about Alexander’s adventures aboard the ISS on his blog here.

Video credit: ESA

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