Category Archives: Just for Fun

This Four-Minute Trailer Supercut is a Star Wars Tsunami

If you’re as excited about Star Wars: The Force Awakens as I am (and apparently plenty of others — tickets for the film have already sold out two months before it opens) then you’ll love this: a nearly four-minute “supercut” of all of the trailers and teasers that have thus far been released. Assembled by James Darling of Science vs. Cinema, this supercut force-feeds you (see what I did there?) a stunning tsunami of Star Wars awesomeness that, besides being way cool, actually helps to place some of the events in context (even if it’s only implied.)

This is one Star Wars movie that I definitely have a good feeling about!

Source: Ain’t it Cool News. HT to PQ.

Deleted Scene From The Martian Shows Even MOAR SCIENCE!!1!

Have you gone to see The Martian yet? (And if you haven’t, my review of it may help speed you on your way.) Did you love it? Just kidding — of course you did. But did you read the book first? If you did, you may have noticed that a lot of Mark Watney’s hands-on science work didn’t make it into the final cut of the film. Which I can understand, because some people actually don’t want to sit in a theater for four hours watching science projects on the big screen. But a few of these scenes were still shot, the above being one of them shared on Twitter today by The Martian author Andy Weir. Check it out — it’s about an experiment called ChemCam, which is actually a real thing being used on Mars right now by the Curiosity rover!

(This also leads me to believe there will be an extended director’s cut of the film that will some day get released that includes all of the cut scenes in place, especially this one — it is Ridley Scott, after all!)

See more deleted scenes from The Martian on the Ares: live YouTube channel.

This Beautiful Webcomic Shows Why Our “Mathematical Skies” Have Not Lost Their Wonder

Our newfound knowledge of

Our newfound knowledge of “what’s out there” has not reduced its fascination (Image © Boulet)

People of past civilizations had their own ideas of what the stars in the night sky are… distant campfires, lights shining through holes in a vast blanket covering the Earth, deceased ancestors, countless and constantly-traveling gods… whether or not they really believed these stories or if they were just tales to inspire poets and provide entertainment on dark nights is hard to tell. But one thing is for certain: we now know what those points of light really are, thanks to the past several centuries of hard work by astronomers, scientists, and engineers, and although that may make ancient tales about the stars obsolete it certainly doesn’t reduce the inherent wonder and beauty of the night sky – if anything, it has increased it many times over.

Recently French cartoonist Boulet illustrated his own lifelong fascination with space in a webcomic published on his site. In a Dante-esque fashion he takes the figure of French singer Georges Brassens on a trip across the solar system, showing him why science and rational thought have not chased away fascination and beauty along with “the old gods”, as Brassens sang in a 1964 song (which I was not familiar with.) “Eureka” was not a death sentence for wonder!

It’s a really beautiful comic, with brilliant timing and subtle animations to highlight keep points along the way. Don’t scroll too fast.

You can view the full scrollable webcomic here in English and/et ici en Français.

HT to Laurie C. for the link.

Watch the Exciting First Trailer for The Martian

The first trailer for The Martian is out, a new film by Ridley Scott based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Andy Weir. (If you haven’t read The Martian you really must check it out – it’s a fantastic “science-reality” adventure about one stranded astronaut’s struggle to survive on Mars and NASA’s attempt to get him back.) After watching this I’m even more excited about it – I think this could spark more space survival movies (à la Gravity) that don’t need to depend on over-imaginative science concepts or alien civilizations as story hooks – real survival on other planets will be dramatic enough!

The Martian will open in U.S. theaters on November 25 October 2!!! The studio switched its opening day to avoid competition with Disney’s Good Dinosaur and the second Hunger Games installment. I’ve got no problem with that! (Source) 

Via The Verge.

What Do You Think Of This Planet Earth Flag?

A concept for an

A concept for an “all-Earth” flag proposed by Oskar Pernefeldt

There was a bit of a press frenzy last week surrounding the idea of a global flag that could be used in instances of human exploration off our planet, where international collaboration could be celebrated and memorialized on alien worlds rather than the more old-timey nationalistic space races with various countries’ flags dotting remote landscapes across the Solar System. To this end Oskar Pernefeldt, a design student at Beckmans College of Design in Stockholm, Sweden, created a proposal for a “Flag for Planet Earth” as a senior project – a flag that could be proudly planted and worn by future astronauts as we expand our presence through space. Various news sites picked up the story, as seen in this article on by Jacob Kastrenakes – and it spread from there as “this is the flag we’ll plant” when we land on Mars, an asteroid, the Moon (again), Europa, etc., etc.

The question is: will it really? And more importantly, would we even want it to be? I, for one, would not.

Read the rest of this entry

Check out Atmospheric Breakup: a Webcomic About the ISS

Webcomic "Atmospheric Breakup" by Andy Warner featuring Ron Garan and the ISS (Source: The Nib)

Webcomic “Atmospheric Breakup” by Andy Warner featuring Ron Garan and the ISS (Source: The Nib)

The International Space Station is the result of an amazing collaboration of many countries and countless individuals from around the world, a research lab and symbol of global peace and partnership put together in space. But recent and growing political tension between the two biggest contributors to the ISS – the United States and Russia – are casting doubt on the status of Station’s future. Will Russia continue its support of the ISS? Or will they build their own space station like some reports have suggested? And if so, what will happen to the current Station?

Ron Garan, former NASA astronaut and ISS crew member, humanitarian, and author of the new book The Orbital Perspective, is featured in a webcomic by Andy Warner (perhaps in honor of Free Comic Book Day?) called “Atmospheric Breakup,” which addresses the significance of the ISS and the challenges facing its future. Check it out on The Nib by clicking the link below or the image above.

By continuing to spread the word about the importance of international collaboration, Ron is showing us that real superheroes wear blue flight suits!

Read the full comic on The Nib here.


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