Blog Archives

Voyager’s Valentine Turns 25 Today

If you’re in love with space exploration then you’ll fall for this: it’s the picture of Earth taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft after it passed the orbit of Pluto in 1990. That image of our planet from almost 4 billion miles away inspired Carl Sagan to write his famous “Pale Blue Dot” passage, and reminds us that we are all just floating on “a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

This is from a post I originally published in 2010. I’ll keep trotting it out until it’s not cool anymore. (Which I don’t think will ever happen.)

Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune as seen by Voyager 1 in 1990 (Credit: NASA)

On February 14, 1990, after nearly 13 years of traveling the solar system, the Voyager 1 spacecraft passed the orbit of Pluto and turned its camera around to take a series of photos of the planets. The image above shows those photos, isolated from the original series and are left to right, top to bottom: Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

From that distance, over 4 billion miles from the Sun, the planets each appear as little more than a bright dot against the vastness of interplanetary space.

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. … There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world.”

– Carl Sagan

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Remembering Huygens’ Titan Landing, Ten Years Later

First color image from the surface of Titan, Jan. 14, 2005 (ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)

This incredible image was captured ten years ago today, on January 14, 2005. It shows the murky surface of Saturn’s moon Titan as seen by the European Space Agency’s Huygens probe after it made its historic descent through the moon’s thick haze and clouds and landed in a frozen plain of crusty methane mud and icy pebbles. During the descent and after landing Huygens returned data for several hours before communication was lost. The groundbreaking images and information it sent back has proved invaluable to scientists studying this unique and mysterious moon, which is at the same time extremely alien and surprisingly Earth-like.

“It was eerie…we saw bright hills above a dark plain, a weird combination of light and dark. It was like seeing a landscape out of Dante.”

– Jonathan Lunine, Cassini-Huygens mission scientist

Learn more about the Huygens landing here and check out an incredible video below zooming in a billion times from Saturn orbit to Titan’s surface:

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Hubble Gives Us Our Best View Yet Of The “Pillars of Creation”

Hubble's newest visible-light image of the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Hubble’s newest visible-light image of the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating the 25th anniversary of its launch this year and to commemorate the milestone it’s recently turned its gaze (during the course of about 15 orbits) back onto one of the most iconic targets of its career: the “Pillars of Creation,” five-light-year-high columns of cold gas in the process of being sculpted by the winds from hot young stars in the Eagle Nebula (M16), some 6,500 light-years away.

Previously imaged with Hubble in 1995, the Pillars really shine (no pun intended) in this new high-definition image acquired with the telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, which was installed in May 2009 during STS-125, NASA’s final servicing mission for Hubble.

And in addition to visible-light* wavelengths Hubble’s WFC3 captured the Pillars in infrared as well, which pierces the dense, cold gas to reveal hidden stars inside – as well as turn the structures into eerie ghostlike shapes. Check out that version below:

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The 2015 Year in Space Calendars Are Here!

The 2015 Year in Space calendar -- full of awesome space info!

If The Year in Space calendar were any more packed with information it would become a black hole. And try hanging one of those on your wall.

What brings you an entire sidereal year of awesome space news and pictures, each and every day? (Besides me, of course?) That’s right: The Year in Space calendar!

Produced by Starry Messenger Press in conjunction with The Planetary Society, the 2015 Year in Space calendar is (like its predecessors) a gorgeous 16″ x 22″ (40.5 cm x 56 cm) work of art filled with over 120 images of space exploration and hundreds upon hundreds of facts and figures about space exploration. Sure it tells you the date like all calendars do, but no other calendar I know of gives you so much great information about astronomical objects, scientists and astronauts, the worlds of our solar system, and on-this-date space exploration history. If you love space – and if you’re reading my blog then I assume you do – then this is the perfect gift for yourself and any other space fans you may know. (Even if they don’t know they’re space fans yet!)

Because Lights in the Dark loves you (and its author is mentioned on the inside front cover) you can get a discount by mentioning that you saw it here. Find out how to get yours below:
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Astronomers Identify an Exoplanet in the Process of Formation

Illustration of the young massive star HD100546 and its surrounding disk (P. Marenfeld & NOAO/AURA/NSF)

Illustration of the young massive star HD100546 and its surrounding disk. Click here for more information. (P. Marenfeld & NOAO/AURA/NSF)

Here at Lights In The Dark I typically keep the articles and information to exploration occurring within our Solar System. But there have been amazing advances in the discovery of worlds far beyond our own family of planets and this recent news is quite fascinating: astronomers have spotted what appears to be a large gaseous exoplanet in the process of formation around a star only 335 light-years away — literally one of our own cosmic neighbors! Not only is this serendipitous, but also provides insight to how the planets and moons in our own Solar System may have formed, 4.6 billion years ago.

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This is How Saturn’s Rings Would Look to a Butterfly

Ultraviolet image of Saturn's rings acquired by Cassini in 2004 (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Boulder)

Ultraviolet image of Saturn’s rings acquired by Cassini in 2004 (NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Boulder)

You don’t typically see Saturn’s rings looking like this, but then you can’t see in ultraviolet like Cassini (or many insects) can! The image above was acquired by the UVIS (UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph) instrument aboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft on June 30, 2004, just as it was entering orbit around Saturn.

The area shown here is about 10,000 km (6,200 miles) across. It’s a small section of ring segments… just a portion of Saturn’s magnificent expanse of rings. Part of the C ring, toward Saturn, is along the left, and the inner edge of the B ring begins just right of the center. The colors are related to the composition of the ring particles; blue and green colors are from bright water ice, reds are rings with darker, “dirtier” particles.

While the colors aren’t “real” per se — our eyes simply can’t see UV light — the association of colors we can see to specific UV wavelengths allows scientists to accurately observe relative differences in the ring segments.

“It is cool that we can pick our own colors in the pictures we produce,” said Dr. Larry W. Esposito, a professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado and UVIS Principal Investigator. “No person has ever seen ultraviolet light, although some butterflies can. Our pictures may thus represent a ‘butterfly’s-eye view’ of the Saturn system.”

Click the image to access a higher-resolution image on ESA’s Flickr page, and read more about the Cassini mission here.

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