Advertisements

Author Archives: Jason Major

Spacecraft Down: Cassini is Gone


It’s official: Cassini’s mission at Saturn is over. Today, at 6:31 a.m. EDT (10:31 UTC), Cassini entered the atmosphere of Saturn. A little over a minute later it sent its final transmission back to Earth before succumbing to the physical forces of entry. That signal, Cassini’s last piece of data, ended at 7:55 a.m. EDT (11:55 UTC). After over thirteen years in orbit Cassini is now a part of Saturn; its work is done.

Mission accomplished.

About 14 hours earlier Cassini transmitted its final images of Saturn to Earth. You can see some of those below: Read the rest of this entry

Advertisements

It’s Time to Say Goodbye to Cassini

Artist’s rendering of Cassini at Saturn. Credit: NASA/JPL

Well, the day has come. Today is the last full day that NASA’s Cassini spacecraft will exist, and in fact right now it is on its final path—a grand soaring arc that will send it down into the atmosphere of Saturn itself on the morning of Friday, Sept. 15. It will be the closest to the ringed planet any spacecraft will have ever gotten, but it’s a trip that Cassini will not long survive. It’s the long-planned end of a glorious mission of exploration and discovery—not to mention beauty, art, and inspiration—and while Cassini itself will soon be gone, the enormous amount of data it has gathered in the twenty years since its launch will continue to drive discovery for many, many years to come.

(At least that’s what we’re all telling ourselves to make the loss a bit easier to bear.)

Read the rest of this entry

Bagging Baily’s Beads

Baily’s Beads captured during the Aug. 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. © Jason Major.

This has to be my favorite photo I captured during the August 21 solar eclipse from Charleston, SC. It shows a phenomenon called Baily’s Beads, which is caused by the last bits of Sun peeking through low points and between mountains along the limb of the Moon in the final moments before 100% totality. They’re only visible for a few seconds between the “diamond ring” effect (which I did not capture) and the appearance of the Sun’s outer corona, and I’m very happy to have caught them on camera!

Read the rest of this entry

Antares is a Bug-Eyed Monster 700 Times Bigger Than Our Sun

Artist’s impression of Antares based on new observations by ESO’s VLTI. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

From a “mere” 93 million miles away we’re able to view the surface of our home star the Sun very well with telescopes on Earth and in space…you can even observe large sunspots with your unaided eye (with proper protection, of course.) But the surface details of other stars tens, hundreds, or thousands of light-years away can’t be so easily resolved from Earth. The details are just too fine and get lost in the brilliance of the stars themselves.

But astronomers have now produced the best image yet of the surface of another star beyond our Solar System. Using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope Interferometer, located on a high plateau in Chile’s Atacama Desert where the sky is some of the clearest and driest in the world, a team of scientists have mapped the movement of material in the atmosphere of Antares, a red supergiant star 700 times the size of our Sun that shines brightly in the heart of the constellation Scorpius. The observations enabled them to determine how material moves through Antares’ atmosphere and then construct an image of the star itself—the most accurate representation of another star besides the Sun.

Read the rest of this entry

Black Hole Sun: Photos of a Total Solar Eclipse

Photo from the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. © Jason Major

Today, August 21, 2017, the Moon briefly slid in front of the Sun, casting its shadow onto the Earth–the deepest part of which (called the umbra) passing across the United States from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. I arranged to be positioned at the latter location, and thus experienced for the first time solar eclipse totality from 2:46 to 2:47 and a half p.m. this afternoon. It was, as they say, a mind-blowing experience…if just in the sheer sense of seeing something entirely different happening to the usually very typical Sun in the middle of what would otherwise be a very typical day. (Except that it was neither of those.)

Below are some of my photos from the event.

Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: