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Uranus Lights Up for Hubble

HST images of Uranus’ aurorae and rings combined with Voyager 2 images of the planet itself. (NASA)

Those white areas aren’t clouds; they’re aurorae—”northern lights”—around the poles of Uranus, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2012 and 2014. (The image of Uranus itself was acquired by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in January 1986.)

“The auroras on Jupiter and Saturn are well-studied, but not much is known about the auroras of the giant ice planet Uranus. In 2011, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope became the first Earth-based telescope to snap an image of the auroras on Uranus. In 2012 and 2014 a team led by an astronomer from Paris Observatory took a second look at the auroras using the ultraviolet capabilities of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) installed on Hubble.”

Aurorae on Uranus are driven by the same process that creates them around Earth’s polar regions: charged particles from the Sun get caught in the planet’s magnetic field and are focused toward the poles, where they make ions in the upper atmosphere release energy—in these observations in ultraviolet wavelengths. Also, since Uranus orbits the Sun “tilted sideways” its polar regions are near the plane of its orbit.

Read the rest of this article from NASA here: Hubble Spots Auroras on Uranus

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Here’s Hubble’s Newest Knockout Portrait of Jupiter

Jupiter imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope on April 3, 2017. Credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (GSFC)

On April 3, 2017, as Jupiter made its nearest approach to Earth in a year, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope viewed the solar system’s largest planet in all of its up-close glory. At a distance of 415 million miles (668 million km) from Earth, Jupiter offered spectacular views of its colorful, roiling atmosphere, the legendary Great Red Spot, and its smaller companion at farther southern latitudes dubbed “Red Spot Jr.” Taken with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3, the image resolves details in Jupiter’s atmosphere as small as about 80 miles (129 km) across.

Read the full article on NASA’s Hubble site here, and check out a version I made with enhanced contrast and sharpness to bring out some details in Jupiter’s clouds below:

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What Can Hubble See? Find Out in This Music Video


Get into a little “Hubble trouble” with this music video by NPR’s Adam Cole, aka Skunk Bear. Produced in honor of the 25th anniversary of the space telescope’s launch aboard Discovery STS-31 on April 24, 1990, the video is a parody of Iggy Azalea’s “Trouble” and, in my opinion, surpasses it astronomically.

(See what I did there?)

Enjoy, and Happy 25th Anniversary Hubble! Also, check out a video of the STS-31 launch below:
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Ganymede’s Aurorae Hint at an Ocean Ten Times Deeper than Earth’s

Illustration of Ganymede's auroral ovals, the stability of which hint at a global underground ocean. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI).

Illustration of Ganymede’s auroral ovals, the stability of which hint at a global underground ocean. Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI).

It’s long been suspected that Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede may harbor a subsurface ocean of liquid water beneath its icy yet hard-as-rock crust, and now some ingenious observations with the Hubble Space Telescope are making an even more convincing case for it!

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Hubble Gives Us Our Best View Yet Of The “Pillars of Creation”

Hubble's newest visible-light image of the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

Hubble’s newest visible-light image of the Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope is celebrating the 25th anniversary of its launch this year and to commemorate the milestone it’s recently turned its gaze (during the course of about 15 orbits) back onto one of the most iconic targets of its career: the “Pillars of Creation,” five-light-year-high columns of cold gas in the process of being sculpted by the winds from hot young stars in the Eagle Nebula (M16), some 6,500 light-years away.

Previously imaged with Hubble in 1995, the Pillars really shine (no pun intended) in this new high-definition image acquired with the telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3, which was installed in May 2009 during STS-125, NASA’s final servicing mission for Hubble.

And in addition to visible-light* wavelengths Hubble’s WFC3 captured the Pillars in infrared as well, which pierces the dense, cold gas to reveal hidden stars inside – as well as turn the structures into eerie ghostlike shapes. Check out that version below:

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