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Juno Will Not Enter Tighter Orbits Around Jupiter, Team Decides

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NASA’s Juno spacecraft will remain in 53-day-long orbits of Jupiter rather than rocket down to smaller 14-day orbits, despite the mission’s original plan to do so. Announced today, Feb. 17, this decision comes after evaluation of issues with helium valves that prevented orbital reduction burns in October and December of 2016.

“During a thorough review, we looked at multiple scenarios that would place Juno in a shorter-period orbit, but there was concern that another main engine burn could result in a less-than-desirable orbit,” said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “The bottom line is a burn represented a risk to completion of Juno’s science objectives.”

Even though Juno will remain in wider orbits its scientific objectives and capability to achieve them shouldn’t be affected—if anything, it will get a chance to explore more of Jupiter’s magnetic environment while reducing the time it spends in some of the more damaging regions of Jupiter’s radiation belts.

The solar-powered Juno spacecraft launched aboard a ULA Atlas V 551 rocket from Cape Canaveral on Aug. 5, 2011. After nearly five years and 1.7 billion miles of travel Juno arrived in orbit at Jupiter on July 4, 2016.

Read the full story here: NASA’s Juno Mission to Remain in Current Orbit at Jupiter

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Junocam Image of the Earth-Sized “Red Spot Jr.” Storm on Jupiter

Enhanced image of Oval BA, aka "Red Spot Jr.," from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Credit: NASA/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major

Enhanced image of Oval BA, aka “Red Spot Jr.,” from NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Credit: NASA/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major

Everyone knows about Jupiter’s famous Great Red Spot, the centuries-old giant anticyclone on Jupiter’s southern hemisphere 2-3 times the size of Earth. But there are many other smaller (but still huge by terrestrial standards!) storms on Jupiter, the largest of which is Oval BA—also known as the “Red Spot Jr.” The image above shows this approximately Earth-sized anticyclone, imaged by NASA’s Juno spacecraft during its 4th “perijove” close pass on Feb. 2, 2017.

I enhanced the original image from Juno’s Junocam instrument to bring out the structure and colors of the swirling clouds in Oval BA. You can see some bright cloud top domes within the center of the storm itself, the result of “boiling” convection cells not unlike what happens in storms on Earth…except on a much larger scale!

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Juno Sends Back Its First Pictures of Jupiter’s North Pole; “Like Nothing We Have Seen Before”

Jupiter's north pole imaged by NASA's Juno spacecraft on Aug. 27, 2016 ( NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

Jupiter’s north pole imaged by Juno on Aug. 27, 2016 (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

Thanks to NASA’s Juno spacecraft we now have our best views yet of the north pole of our Solar System’s largest planet and they’re “hardly recognizable as Jupiter” according to the mission’s lead scientist!

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Juno Just Hours from Jupiter Arrival

Juno will reach Jupiter in 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL

Juno is on its way to enter orbit at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL

After nearly 5 years of traveling through space NASA’s Juno spacecraft is just a few dozen hours away from entering orbit around Jupiter, the Solar System’s largest, most massive, and most extreme planet.

“We are ready,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). “The science team is incredibly excited to be arriving at Jupiter. The engineers and mission controllers are performing at an Olympic level getting Juno successfully into orbit. As Juno barrels down on Jupiter, the scientists are busy looking at the amazing approach science the spacecraft has already returned to Earth. Jupiter is spectacular from afar and will be absolutely breathtaking from close up.”

Learn more about the mission and find out how to watch the long-awaited event live below:

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Jupiter’s Moons Make Ghostly Auroral “Footprints”

UV image of Jupiter taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on November 26, 1998. (NASA/ESA, John Clarke (University of Michigan))

Aurorae seen in a UV image of Jupiter taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on November 26, 1998. (Credit: NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team)

We have all marveled at incredible photos and time-lapse videos of Earth’s auroral displays, captured by talented photographers that have braved the frigid nighttime temperatures of remote high-latitude locations as well as by those privileged few living in orbit aboard the International Space Station. But our planet isn’t the only one with curtains of light crowning its poles – aurorae have been observed on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune as well (and Venus may even have them too.) While we know that these light shows are caused by interactions between atoms in planets’ upper atmospheres and charged particles from the Sun that get caught up in magnetic fields focusing out from around the poles, Jupiter in particular is known to have a peculiar additional type of auroral feature, created by the moons that orbit it.

The image above, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on November 26, 1998, shows Jupiter’s north polar region in ultraviolet light. The planet’s energetic aurorae can be seen wrapping around its pole in wavy circular arcs, just like Earth’s does. But there are also several bright spots that aren’t due to solar activity but are instead the “footprints” of three of its largest moons: Ganymede, Europa, and Io.

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The Brightest Lights: 12 Awesome Space Stories of 2013

1400-image mosaic of Earthlings waving at Saturn on July 19, 2013 (NASA/JPL)

1400-image mosaic of Earthlings waving at Saturn on July 19, 2013 (NASA/JPL)

What a year for space exploration! With 2013 coming to a close I thought I would look back on some of the biggest news in space that I’ve featured here on Lights in the Dark. Rather than a “top ten” list, as is common with these year-end reviews, I’m going to do more of a month-by-month (hence the 12) to help recollect some of the amazing stories and sights that 2013 has brought us. And with some of the big headliners we’ve seen this year it’s easy to lose sight of the smaller (but no less fascinating) discoveries — so I’ll be sure to include some of those too. After all, when it comes to learning about the Universe there’s no “little” news!

Ready? Let’s go!

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