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OSIRIS-REx Captures a Picture of Jupiter from L4

Jupiter imaged by OSIRIS-REx on Feb. 12, 2017. The visible moons are Callisto, Io, and Ganymede. (NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona)

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx may be designed to study asteroids close up but recently it’s captured a view of something farther away and much, much larger: the giant planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons at a distance of over 400 million miles!

The image was taken on Feb. 12, 2017, when the spacecraft was 76 million miles (122 million km) away from Earth—near the Earth-Sun L4 point—and 418 million miles (673 million km) from Jupiter. It’s a combination of two images taken with the PolyCam instrument, OSIRIS-REx’s longest range camera, which will capture images of the asteroid Bennu from a distance of over a million miles.

Read the full article here: NASA’s OSIRIS-REx Takes Closer Image of Jupiter

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Share Your Love of Cassini and Saturn with the World

Amateur-processed images from Cassini. Top: Saturn mosaic by Ian Regan; Lower left: Enceladus in the E Ring by Val Klavans; Lower right: Crescent Titan by Jason Major.

Amateur-processed images from Cassini. Top: Saturn mosaic by Ian Regan; Lower left: Enceladus in the E Ring by Val Klavans; Lower right: Crescent Titan by Jason Major.

Even if you’re feeling inundated by Valentine-themed everything at the moment, if you love space and you’re at all creative you’re definitely going to adore this. With Cassini in the final months of its 13 years at Saturn, NASA wants you to share your love of the spacecraft, its discoveries, and the ringed planet and its fascinating family of moons.

“We’re so gratified that Cassini’s images have inspired people to work with the pictures themselves to produce such beautiful creations,” said Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “It’s been truly wonderful for us to feel the love for Cassini from the public. The feeling from those of us on the mission is mutual.”

In honor of Cassini’s last year in orbit (as well as its last Valentine’s Day!) the mission team is inviting all the Saturn lovers out there to share their Cassini-inspired creations through the “Cassini Inspires” outreach program. Digital art, processed images, paintings, drawings, songs, poems…if it drew any inspiration at all from something Cassini made possible, share it with the world!

Read more here: A Valentine: From Cassini with Love

This is Jupiter Seen from Mars

Jupiter and its four largest moons imaged by the HiRISE camera in orbit around Mars on Jan. 11, 2007. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)

Jupiter and its four largest moons imaged by the HiRISE camera in orbit around Mars on Jan. 11, 2007. (NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)

The HiRISE camera aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is specifically designed to take super high-resolution images of the surface of Mars but it also does a pretty darn good job capturing pictures of other objects too—like Jupiter and its Galilean moons, several hundred million miles away! The image above was captured in expanded color (that is, it includes wavelengths in infrared) by HiRISE on January 11, 2007, and shows the giant planet from Mars orbit.

Mars and Jupiter were at opposition at the time, only about 345 million miles apart.

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Eppur Si Muove: Galileo’s Big Night, 407 Years Ago Today

Jupiter and its four largest "Galilean" moons photographed on April 16, 2016. © Jason Major

Jupiter and its four largest “Galilean” moons photographed on April 16, 2016. © Jason Major

407 years ago tonight, on January 7, 1610, the Pisan astronomer Galileo Galilei looked up at a brilliantly-shining Jupiter through his own handmade telescope and saw three bright little “stars” next to it, stirring his natural scientific curiosity. Further observations over the next several nights showed that the planet wasn’t moving relative to the little “stars” as it should if they were distant background stars, but rather the bright objects (of which he soon saw four) were moving along with Jupiter. Galileo correctly concluded that those little objects weren’t stars at all but rather moons that orbited the distant planet—and, most importantly, not the Earth. This cosmic revelation forced a change of the entire view of our solar system (causing no end of trouble for Galileo as the Church didn’t appreciate a challenge to their Earth-centered Universe) but also opened the door for the discovery of many more moons around other planets.

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More Moons For Uranus?

Voyager 2 view of Uranus with  rings and moons noted (Credit: NASA/University of Arizona/Erich Karkoschka)

Voyager 2 view of Uranus with rings and moons noted (Credit: NASA/University of Arizona/Erich Karkoschka)

The distant ice giant Uranus may not have been visited by a spacecraft since Voyager 2’s “Grand Tour” flyby in 1986 but the data gathered then is still being used today to make new discoveries. Most recently, researchers think they have found evidence of two previously unknown moons around Uranus, potentially bringing the planet’s count up to 29.

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Watch Saturn’s Moons Race Inside the Rings

Saturn's moons Prometheus and Atlas are captured by Cassini in these images from Aug. 23, 2016

Saturn’s moons Prometheus and Atlas are captured by Cassini in these images from Aug. 23, 2016

Round and round they go… the animation above, made from 14 raw images taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on August 23, 2016, shows the moons Prometheus and Atlas orbiting Saturn within the Roche Division gap between its A (top right) and F (center) rings. The gravitational tug of Prometheus (92 miles / 148 km long) is strong enough to pull on the fine, smoke-like icy particles of the F ring, creating streamer and “clump” features that follow it along.

The much smaller Atlas (23 miles / 37 km wide) follows a path around Saturn just past the outer edge of the A ring. It was once thought to be a “shepherd moon” of the A ring, but it’s now known that the pull of the more distant Janus and Epimetheus are responsible for that.

Atlas does have its very own ring, though—a very faint (i.e., not visible above) band of material that runs along its orbit named R/2004 S 1, discovered by the Cassini mission in July 2004.

Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI. Animation by Jason Major.

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