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Jupiter’s Red Spot Dominates New Juno P7 Pics

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot imaged by Juno on July 10, 2017. Credit: NASA/SwRI/MSSS/Jason Major

They’ve arrived! Images from NASA’s Juno spacecraft P7 pass have landed on Earth (a few days early no less) showing Jupiter’s Great Red Spot from the closest distance that it’s ever been imaged before. Captured on the night of July 10 (early July 11 morning UTC) the closest Junocam images were taken from a distance of only about 5,600 miles from the top of the storm’s clouds—that’s less than an Earth diameter away from a hundreds-year-old hurricane an Earth and a half wide!

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Asteroid 2014 JO25 Gets Some Sweet Radar Love

Radar observations of near-Earth asteroid 2014 JO25 on April 19, 2017.

This is our best look yet at asteroid 2014 JO25, which made its closest pass by Earth for at least the next 500 years on April 19, 2017. The animation above is composed of radar observations made from NASA’s Goldstone facility in California when the asteroid was between 1.53 and 1.61 million miles away. These and earlier, lower-resolution images obtained the previous day (you can see those here) showed this asteroid to be a contact binary—two objects connected by a “neck” of material, not unlike the comet 67P that ESA’s Rosetta mission explored. The largest section of JO25 is estimated to be 2,000 feet (610 meters) wide, and at its widest the entire asteroid is about 3,300 feet (1 km) across. Observations also show JO25 rotates once every 4.5 hours.

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NEAR Showed Us a Rocky World of Love

The asteroid Eros imaged by NEAR Shoemaker on March 3, 2000. (NASA/JPL/JHUAPL)

The asteroid Eros imaged by NEAR Shoemaker on March 3, 2000. (NASA/JPL/JHUAPL)

This image of the asteroid Eros—named after the Greek god of love—was captured on March 3, 2000, by NASA’s NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft. It’s actually a mosaic of six separate images acquired from a distance of 127 miles from the 20-mile-wide asteroid, and reveals many large boulders scattered across the surface down to about 160 feet in size. The ubiquitous boulders on Eros are believed to be fragments of its own native rock, shattered by countless impact events over time.

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ESO Images NGC 1055, a Spiral Galaxy “On the Edge”

The spiral galaxy NGC 1055, imaged by ESO’s VLT (Credit: ESO)

The European Southern Observatory’s unimaginatively-named but incredibly powerful Very Large Telescope (VLT) located on a remote plateau high in the mountains of Chile’s Atacama Desert has captured a detailed view of NGC 1055, a spiral galaxy a little larger than our own located 55 million light-years away. On galactic scales this is relatively close by, and our edge-on perspective allows astronomers to determine the three-dimensional structure of this island of stars.

Spiral galaxies across the Universe can be found at all angles in relation to our viewpoint here on Earth. Some we see “face on,” which dramatically shows a spiral galaxy’s long, arcing arms and bright center but make it difficult to get a sense of true shape or variations in density. With NGC 1055 we see it “on edge,” without which it likely wouldn’t be known that it’s being tugged by one of its galactic neighbors.

Read the full story from ESO here: A Galaxy on the Edge

This Nebula Really Stinks!

The Calabash Nebula, located 5,000 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

This image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows the Calabash Nebula, the cosmic death throes of a low-mass star like our Sun. Caught during the astronomically brief phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula, the star is ejecting much of its mass out into space at velocities of over 620,000 mph.

So why does it “stink?” The bright yellow jets are known to contain a lot of sulphur compounds, so if the image were a scratch ‘n’ sniff sticker it would smell like rotten eggs (hence its nickname, Rotten Egg Nebula.)

This spectacular display won’t last long; with its eruption begun in earnest about 800 years ago, in another 1,000 years this will resemble a more typical planetary nebula. In fact, given that this object is 5,000 light-years away, it’s technically already done with its sulfurous outburst! We’re just now seeing the light from the event as it arrives at Earth.

Read more in the NASA release: Hubble Captures Brilliant Star Death in “Rotten Egg” Nebula

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