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This Nebula Really Stinks!

The Calabash Nebula, located 5,000 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

This image from the Hubble Space Telescope shows the Calabash Nebula, the cosmic death throes of a low-mass star like our Sun. Caught during the astronomically brief phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula, the star is ejecting much of its mass out into space at velocities of over 620,000 mph.

So why does it “stink?” The bright yellow jets are known to contain a lot of sulphur compounds, so if the image were a scratch ‘n’ sniff sticker it would smell like rotten eggs (hence its nickname, Rotten Egg Nebula.)

This spectacular display won’t last long; with its eruption begun in earnest about 800 years ago, in another 1,000 years this will resemble a more typical planetary nebula. In fact, given that this object is 5,000 light-years away, it’s technically already done with its sulfurous outburst! We’re just now seeing the light from the event as it arrives at Earth.

Read more in the NASA release: Hubble Captures Brilliant Star Death in “Rotten Egg” Nebula

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