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SDO Enters Its Seventh Year Observing Our Sun

Happy Launchiversary SDO! NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory lifted off aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral on Feb. 11, 2010, and has been observing our home star in high-definition ever since. SDO has provided us with unprecedented views of the Sun’s ever-changing atmosphere and data on the space weather it creates over the course of its prime mission and, now in an extended mission, will hopefully continue to do so for many years to come.

The video above is a compilation of images SDO acquired with its Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument during 2015, made into a single time-lapse video. Each frame is 2 hours of real time and clearly shows the Sun’s constant magnetic activity and movement of its 25-day-long rotation.

Short blank gaps and shifts in movement are due to SDO going offline occasionally for recalibration and repositioning itself in Earth orbit (and sometimes the Moon and Earth even get in the way briefly!) At 2:50 a solar physicist from Goddard Space Flight Center describes some of the features seen in the video, so be sure to watch the whole thing. (You can find an even higher-resolution version here.)

Learn more about SDO and see its most recent images here.

Credit: NASA/GSFC

 

 

 

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Happy 5th Launchiversary SDO!

Five years ago today, at 10:23 a.m. EST on Feb, 11, 2010, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory launched aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, sending the most advanced solar observatory satellite into orbit and giving us an amazing new look at our home star. Since then SDO has been monitoring the Sun on a constant minute-by-minute basis, sending back terabytes of data and capturing 200 million images over 1,826 days in space, 22,300 miles from Earth.

The video above is an homage to SDO from the team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Here’s to five amazing years and hopefully many more ahead! Learn more about SDO and get the most up-to-date images and information here.

Also, watch the 2010 launch of SDO below:

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Four Years of SDO

It’s hard to believe it’s already been four years that NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory has kept a watchful eye on our home star, but here we are: 2014, and the four-year anniversary of the Feb. 11 launch has come and gone. Amazing. But what’s even more amazing are all the incredible observations and discoveries SDO has made of the Sun in that relatively short time!

Check out the video above, a compilation from the talented people over at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, showing some of the best solar sights from SDO over the past four years.

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Questions About ISON? Here Are Some Answers:

Comet ISON imaged on Nov. 19 with the Marshall Space Flight Center 20" telescope in New Mexico (NASA/MSFC/MEO/Cameron McCarty)

Comet ISON imaged on Nov. 19 with the Marshall Space Flight Center 20″ telescope in New Mexico (NASA/MSFC/MEO/Cameron McCarty)

Unless you’ve been living in the Oort Cloud you’ve probably heard about the current travels of comet C/2012 S1 (aka ISON) through the inner solar system. Although this soon-to-be “sungrazing” comet was first spotted by astronomers Vitali Nevski (from Belarus) and Artyom Novichonok (Russia) on Sept. 21, 2012, it’s actually been on its way toward the Sun for much, much longer — possibly for the past several million years or so. But on November 28 at 1:38 p.m. EST, as many Americans are sitting down for their Thanksgiving Day dinners here in the U.S., ISON will make its closest pass around the Sun (called perihelion) and, while you won’t be able to see it in the sky at that point (it’s much too close to the Sun right now) our many eyes in the sky will be watching.

There’s been a lot of misinformation passed around the ‘net recently regarding ISON (as seems to be de rigueur whenever something astronomical is occurring) and I can’t stress enough that there’s no reason to be concerned about this comet’s visit. If anything, ISON should be the one worried — there’s still a chance that it won’t survive perihelion intact! In fact, some reports are suggesting that it already has broken up (which as yet has not been confirmed). So to answer some of the most common questions people have been asking about ISON, NASA has shared some video interviews with experts on the subject. Watch them below:

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Watch the Sun’s Skin Split Open (and Then Heal Itself)

Like some kind of stellar superhero (or maybe a cosmic vampire!) our Sun’s surface splits apart and then fuses itself back together in this mesmerizing video from SDO and the folks at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center — check it out!

All right now, while the Sun doesn’t really have skin like we do or a hard surface like the Earth, it does have multiple layers of varying density and temperature, all wrapped and bound and pierced by intense magnetic fields (hm… sounds a little kinky!) This is what we’re seeing here — magnetic fields filled with super-hot solar plasma playing across the Sun. NASA even titled this video “Canyon of Fire” although that’s taking poetic license too… there’s no fire on the Sun.

Still, the event, which occurred on Sept. 29-30, is amazing to watch through SDO’s UV-sensitive eyes! Our home star is quite a dynamic thing (luckily for us and all life on Earth.)

Read more about what’s happening here.

Video credit: NASA/SDO/GSFC

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