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Juno’s Latest Flight Over Jupiter’s South Pole

Animation of six images acquired by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on March 27, 2017.

On Monday, March 27, at 4:52 a.m. EDT (08:52 UTC) NASA’s Juno spacecraft made its fifth close pass of Jupiter, passing about 2,700 miles (4,400 km) above the planet’s clouds while traveling at a relative speed of 129,000 mph (57.8 kilometers per second). The images above, captured with the JunoCam instrument, show the giant planet’s south pole during this P5 pass.

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Titan’s Beautiful, Boiling Southern Vortex

True-color composite image of Titan’s south polar vortex (NASA/JPL/SSI)

Thanks to Cassini’s new vantage point granted by its inclined orbit researchers have gotten a new look at the south pole of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. What they’ve recently discovered is a swirling vortex of gas forming over the moon’s pole, likely the result of the approach of winter on Titan’s southern hemisphere.

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Saturn’s Southern Cyclone

South Pole Storms

South Pole Storms

A great spiraling whirlpool of wind-whipped clouds wraps around Saturn’s southern pole, photographed here in polarized infrared light by Cassini on July 15, 2008. Towering white clouds mark areas of rising heat from deep within the atmosphere. The winds around the vortex have been measured at over 300mph (480 km/h).

This photo shows an area over 3,000 miles (4,828 km) wide.

Using special filters the cloud structures and wind patterns of Saturn become visible, showing the incredible ferocity of its atmosphere. In visible wavelenghts Saturn appears rather calm and smooth but viewed in another light its true nature is seen:

Thanks to the special camera filters aboard the Cassini-Huygens orbiter, Saturn’s cloud layers can be pierced for further study. There’s still much to be learned about the ringed planet. Learn more about the ongoing Cassini mission here.

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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