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The Chirp Heard Round the World: How Scientists Confirmed the LIGO Detection

It’s been a year since researchers with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) announced the first direct observations of gravitational waves, the oscillations in the fabric of space and time created by powerful cosmic events—like the merging of two massive black holes. This cosmic phenomenon was first predicted by Einstein in 1915, but it took a century for technology to become capable of detecting it. On Sept. 14, 2015, the twin LIGO observatories in Louisiana and Washington state both registered an oh-so-subtle shake that came from far outside our planet…1.3 billion light-years away, in fact.

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Here’s What It Would Look Like to Land on Pluto’s Heart

A view of Pluto's surface imaged by NASA's New Horizons in July 2015

A view of Pluto’s surface imaged by NASA’s New Horizons in July 2015. The yellow bar is 15 miles across. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI)

What would it look like to approach Pluto for a landing? Perhaps some day in the future a robotic mission will do exactly that and we’ll know for sure, but for now we have to use our imaginations…luckily we do have some incredible images of Pluto to help with the details, thanks to NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft!

Using images and data acquired by New Horizons during its historic close pass by Pluto on July 14, 2015, researchers have assembled a video simulating an approach to Pluto’s surface, centering in on a “landing site” along the edge of Sputnik Planum: the heart-shaped “sea” of nitrogen ice cells.

Watch the video below:

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Friday Fun: Plop Plop, Fizz Fizz…in Zero-G

During his 340-day-long One-Year Mission in 2015-2016 NASA astronaut Scott Kelly conducted—and was the subject of—countless experiments on the effects of long-duration space travel aboard the ISS. But he did manage to have a little fun too; the video above shows what happens to a blob of water free-floating in microgravity (that’s the technical term for zero-g in orbit) when Kelly adds some food coloring and a piece of Alka-Seltzer. The results are interesting to say the least as well as quite beautiful…be sure to watch in high-definition to catch the castoff watery “meteors!”

Learn more about the One-Year Mission here (and h/t to Aeon Magazine editor Corey Powell for the video!)

Seeds in the Cosmic Wind: Carl Sagan on Space Exploration

Got the Monday back-to-work blues? Upset by bad news headlines? Concerned about a potential future President Trump? Take a couple of minutes and watch this.

This video, published by The Royal Institution on YouTube in Dec. 2015 and shared again on Twitter today, features an adorable animation about spaceflight with narration taken from a lecture given by Carl Sagan in 1977.

At that time it had been five years since humans had last walked on the Moon, the first Space Shuttle flight was still three and a half years away and the Voyagers had only just passed the orbit of Mars. But Sagan’s confidence and enthusiasm about the future of space exploration and human spaceflight is as inspirational now as it was then…let us continue to remember his words and pass along his message to each new generation that looks up and wonders “what’s out there” and, more importantly, “can I go?”

“Artifacts from Earth are spinning out into the cosmos. I believe the time will come when most human cultures will be engaged in an activity you might describe as a dandelion going to seed.”
— Carl Sagan, 1977

Did NASA Purposely Cut Space Station Footage of a UFO?

Screen Shot 2016-07-13 at 5.19.07 PM

A truly “unidentified” object on ISS live feed on July 9, 2016…WHAT COULD IT BE?

Various news outlets today have run with a story about a supposed UFO spotted on live video streamed from the International Space Station, in which a bright object is visible “descending” into Earth’s atmosphere. The video* was shared on YouTube by a self-proclaimed UFO hunter—which basically means someone who stares at ISS feeds on their computers until their eyes melt and any speck of anything seen moving is instantly circled, copied into a slow-mo edited version, and overlaid with ominous music and/or bold text highlights claiming alien visitation and government cover-ups. (Views ensue.)

To help this particular spotting along is the fact that the feed cut out just as the object nears the edge of the atmosphere. Assured proof of a galactic-scale conspiracy by NASA and the NWO, right???

Please. Here’s my two-and-a-half cents:

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Watch Juno’s Arrival at Majestic Jupiter, Moons and All

We are the stewards of over 400 years of scientific exploration of our Solar System, which it could be said began in earnest when Galileo Galilei first observed the motions of Jupiter’s moons in his homemade telescope in 1610. Over the centuries our knowledge—and our curiosity—about the seemingly endless variety of worlds in the Solar System has grown in leaps and bounds since Galileo’s first peeks at Jupiter, with increasingly more powerful telescopes both on Earth and in space and eventually even machines sent to join the planets in orbit around the Sun.

Last night NASA’s Juno spacecraft became humanity’s most recent emissary to the Solar System’s biggest planet, successfully performing the rocket burns needed to enter orbit around Jupiter—the first spacecraft to do so in 13 years. Amongst much excitement and deserved congratulations of the mission team, the video above was released showing Juno’s view as it approached the enormous planet the week before arrival after five years and 1.7 billion miles of travel. It’s dramatic and impressive and beautiful…just as it should be, considering the scope and achievement of the mission and the information that will soon be returned. Congratulations Juno!

“With Juno, we will investigate the unknowns of Jupiter’s massive radiation belts to delve deep into not only the planet’s interior, but into how Jupiter was born and how our entire solar system evolved.”
— NASA Administrator Charles Bolden

Learn more about the Juno mission here and visit the NASA site here.

(HT to Rachelle Williams @AstroAnarchy for the video tip.)

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