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Juno Sends Back Its First Pictures of Jupiter’s North Pole; “Like Nothing We Have Seen Before”

Jupiter's north pole imaged by NASA's Juno spacecraft on Aug. 27, 2016 ( NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

Jupiter’s north pole imaged by Juno on Aug. 27, 2016 (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS)

Thanks to NASA’s Juno spacecraft we now have our best views yet of the north pole of our Solar System’s largest planet and they’re “hardly recognizable as Jupiter” according to the mission’s lead scientist!

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Cassini Has Made Its Last Pass by Enceladus. Here Are the Pictures.

The limb of Enceladus imaged by Cassini from a distance of 15,000 miles (24,000 kilometers) on Dec. 19, 2015. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

The limb of Enceladus imaged by Cassini from a distance of 15,000 miles (24,000 kilometers) on Dec. 19, 2015. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

After nearly eleven and a half years in orbit around Saturn the Cassini spacecraft has made its last-ever targeted flyby of Enceladus, the 320-mile-wide moon of Saturn that has intrigued scientists and the public alike with its active water ice geysers for more than a decade since their discovery. On Saturday Dec. 19, 2015, Cassini performed its E-22 flyby of Enceladus, coming within 3,106 miles (5,000 km) of the moon’s fractured and frozen surface as it sped by at over 21,000 mph. It captured some incredible images along the way, including the one above showing a crescent-lit Enceladus from its night side silhouetted against the hazy upper atmosphere of Saturn, 150,000 miles beyond.

Take a look through some more raw images from the E-22 flyby below.

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Pluto Is the New Science Star of the Solar System

This "psychedelic" picture of Pluto accentuates the subtlest color differences across its surface. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

This “psychedelic” picture of Pluto accentuates the subtlest color differences across its surface. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)

Now over four months after the historic and long-awaited flyby of Pluto by New Horizons, planetary scientists have had a steady stream of unprecedented data arriving on Earth from the outwardly-speeding spacecraft. We’ve learned more about Pluto in the past few months than we had over the decades before and the information is still being analyzed — and is still coming. This surprising little world and its strange family of mismatched moons, 33 times farther from the Sun than us, has become in the latter half of 2015 the scientific “star of the Solar System.” (Take that all you can’t-be-a-planet folks!)

“It’s hard to imagine how rapidly our view of Pluto and its moons are evolving as new data stream in each week. As the discoveries pour in from those data, Pluto is becoming a star of the Solar System. Moreover, I’d wager that for most planetary scientists, any one or two of our latest major findings on one world would be considered astounding. To have them all is simply incredible.”
– Dr. Alan Stern, New Horizons Principal Investigator, SwRI

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Soar Over the Surface of Tethys with Cassini

Animation of Tethys' surface made from raw Cassini images acquired Nov. 11, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI. Animation by J. Major.)

Animation of Tethys’ surface made from raw Cassini images acquired Nov. 11, 2015. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI. Animation by J. Major.)

On Nov. 11, 2015, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft passed relatively closely by Saturn’s moon Tethys, one of the ringed planet’s larger icy satellites. The animation above was made from 29 raw images acquired with Cassini’s narrow-angle camera as it passed by; you can see part of the incredibly cratered and ancient surface of this 662 mile (1,065 km) wide moon. Talk about flyover country!

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Pics Are In from Cassini’s Flyby Through Enceladus’ Plumes!

The southern hemisphere of Enceladus imaged by Cassini upon approach on Oct. 28, 2015.

The southern hemisphere of Enceladus imaged by Cassini upon approach on Oct. 28, 2015.

On Wed. Oct. 28 Cassini performed its lowest-altitude dive yet through the icy plumes of Enceladus, coming just 30 miles from the moon’s surface — that’s only about 6 times higher than a commercial airliner at cruising altitude. But, traveling over 19,000 mph relative to Enceladus (which is 38 times faster than a jet plane!) the pass was over in just a few seconds. Still, Cassini managed to capture some images before, during, and after closest approach — and they’ve arrived on Earth today.

Here are some of the raw images from the E-21 flyby. These have not been validated or made into official releases by NASA or the Cassini imaging team yet, but they are a nice teaser of what we might expect once they are. (And, of course, the science performed during the flyby has yet to be revealed.) So pics only for now!

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Cassini Bids Farewell to Dione with Some Fantastic Final Views

Mosaic of Saturn's 700-mile-wide moon Dione made from nine images acquired on Aug. 17, 2015. Saturn itself covers the entire background. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

Mosaic of Saturn’s 700-mile-wide moon Dione made from nine images acquired during its “D-5” flyby on Aug. 17, 2015. Saturn itself covers the entire background. (NASA/JPL/SSI)

NASA’s venerable Cassini spacecraft may still have another two years left in its exploration of the Saturn system but on Monday, August 17, it had its final intimate visit with Dione, one of Saturn’s largest natural satellites at nearly 700 miles (1,126 km) across. On that day Cassini passed within 300 miles (480 km) of Dione at 2:33 p.m. EDT (18:33 UTC), not its closest flyby ever but certainly near enough to get some truly spectacular views of the icy moon’s ancient and cratered surface.

Check out some of Cassini’s last close-up images of Dione below:

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