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Bagging Baily’s Beads

Baily’s Beads captured during the Aug. 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. © Jason Major.

This has to be my favorite photo I captured during the August 21 solar eclipse from Charleston, SC. It shows a phenomenon called Baily’s Beads, which is caused by the last bits of Sun peeking through low points and between mountains along the limb of the Moon in the final moments before 100% totality. They’re only visible for a few seconds between the “diamond ring” effect (which I did not capture) and the appearance of the Sun’s outer corona, and I’m very happy to have caught them on camera!

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Neil Armstrong Was The First Person On The Moon And THIS Is Our Best Picture Of Him There?!?

Panorama from Apollo 11 showing Neil Armstrong at the LM Eagle (NASA)

Panorama from Apollo 11 showing Neil Armstrong at the LM Eagle, with the US flag and Solar Wind Experiment at left. (NASA)

Everyone knows that Apollo 11 commander Neil A. Armstrong was the first human to set foot on the Moon (and if you didn’t know, that occurred on July 20, 1969 – yes, it really happened). It was a momentous, history-making event that many (like myself) consider one of the most impressive achievements of humankind. But oddly enough, even with high-resolution Hasselblad film cameras there on location, there are very few photos showing Armstrong himself on the surface of the Moon. In fact the one above, an otherwise very nice panorama captured by fellow Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, really is the best image in existence of Armstrong on the Moon.

So…why is that?

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This is the Oldest Surviving Photo of the Moon

Daguerreotype of the Moon from March 26, 1840, attributed to Dr. John Draper. Original image courtesy of Prof. Baryd Still, NYU Archives.

Daguerreotype of the Moon from March 1840, attributed to Dr. John William Draper. Original image courtesy of Prof. Baryd Still, NYU Archives.

These days anyone with a cheap point-and-shoot camera or even a cell phone can snap a picture of the Moon (although I highly advise using at least an entry-level dSLR) but there was a time when that wasn’t the case. Go back to the late 1830s, when photography was in its infancy and methods for capturing light and shadows for posterity were on the cutting edge of invention, and the Moon was an elusive target for even the most skilled practitioners. But, in March of 1840, John William Draper changed that with his lunar “portrait”—the world’s first true astrophoto.

“This is the first time that anything like a distinct representation of the moon’s surface has been obtained.”
— Contemporary description of Draper’s 1840 daguerreotype

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This is Our Best Photo of Neil Armstrong on the Moon

Panorama from Apollo 11 showing Neil Armstrong at the LM Eagle (NASA)

Panorama from Apollo 11 showing Neil Armstrong at the LM Eagle, with the US flag and Solar Wind Experiment at left. (NASA)

Everyone knows that Apollo 11 commander Neil A. Armstrong was the first human to set foot on the Moon (and if you didn’t know, that occurred on July 20, 1969 – yes, it really happened). It was a momentous, history-making event that many (like myself) consider one of the most impressive achievements of humankind. But oddly enough, even with high-resolution Hasselblad film cameras there on location, there are very few photos showing Armstrong himself on the surface of the Moon. In fact the one above, a panorama captured by fellow Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, really is the best image in existence of Neil on the Moon.

So…why is that?

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A Frog Makes One Giant Leap for Lunar Exploration

The launch of a Minotaur V rocket with NASA's LADEE mission on Sept. 6, 2013. (Credit NASA/Wallops/Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport)

The launch of a Minotaur V rocket with NASA’s LADEE mission on Sept. 6, 2013. (Credit NASA/Wallops/Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport)

At 11:27 pm EDT on September 6, 2013, NASA’s LADEE mission lifted off aboard a Minotaur V rocket from the Wallops Flight Facility on the Virginia shore, a launch visible across the entire northeast coast as it arced beautifully over the Atlantic on its way to the Moon.

Sadly, at least one frog may have been harmed in the making of this mission.

The fate of this splayed amphibian is as yet unknown.

The fate of this splayed amphibian is as yet unknown.

The photo above, taken by an automated camera set up near the launch site, shows Orbital Sciences Minotaur vehicle lifting off on a column of flame and steam. Silhouetted against the backlit exhaust cloud on the right is an airborne frog, likely flung from one of the small ponds near the pad.

According to Nancy Atkinson on Universe Today, Wallops spokesman Jeremy Eggers confirmed the picture is legitimate and was not altered in any way.

Perhaps in memoriam this will become the unofficial mascot of the facility, like the “space bat” that hitched a last ride on a shuttle fuel tank in 2009. He really should get a name… how about “Wally”?

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Also, here’s a little tribute song to Rocket Frog, via BurritoJustice and Allesondra Springmann (with apologies to Mr. Bowie):

Ground Control to Major Frog
Commencing countdown engines on
WTF are you doing in the pond
Check ignition and may frog’s love be with you
 
This is Major Frog to Ground Control
I thought I had a few seconds more
And I’m floating in a most peculiar way
And the pond looks very different today
 
Can you hear me Major Frog
Can you hear me Major Frog
Can you hear me Major Frog
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