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From the LITD Archives: Saturn’s Southern Storm

Originally posted on March 3, 2009:

South Pole Storms

Saturns South Pole Storm (south faces up in this image)

A great spiraling whirlpool of wind-whipped clouds wraps around Saturn’s southern pole, photographed here in polarized infrared light by Cassini on July 15, 2008. Towering white clouds mark areas of rising heat from deep within the atmosphere. The winds around the vortex have been measured at over 300 mph.

This photo shows an area over 3,000 miles (4828 km) wide.

Using special filters the cloud structures and wind patterns of Saturn become visible, showing the incredible ferocity of its atmosphere. In visible wavelenghts Saturn appears rather calm and smooth but viewed in another light its true nature is seen:

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Thanks to the special camera filters aboard the Cassini orbiter Saturn’s cloud layers can be pierced for further study…there’s still so much to be learned about the ringed planet!

Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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About Jason Major

Jason is a Rhode Island-based graphic designer, photographer, nature lover, space exploration fanatic, and coffee addict. In no particular order.

Posted on April 15, 2011, in Repost, Saturn and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on From the LITD Archives: Saturn’s Southern Storm.

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