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Fastest, Farthest, First: New Horizons Closing in on Pluto


It’s a journey spanning 85 years and billions of miles: humanity’s first-ever encounter with the dwarf planet system of Pluto and Charon, located in the frozen far reaches of our Solar System where our entire planet is a barely-visible pale blue dot — just a “mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.” Launched in 2006, the New Horizons spacecraft will pass by Pluto in July 2015 and send back images and data in unprecedented detail, 85 years after its discovery. With the flyby just about a year and a half away, the excitement in the space community is rapidly building even now.

The video above is a “teaser” for the event from the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University — check it out. (Warning: may contain scenes of intense scientific discovery!) Also, watch a longer documentary below on the history of Pluto and the New Horizons mission:

Artist's impression of New Horizons' encounter with Pluto in 2015. (NASA/Thierry Lombry)

Artist’s impression of New Horizons’ encounter with Pluto in 2015. (NASA/Thierry Lombry)

Mission operators at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md., “woke” New Horizons on Jan. 5. Over the next two weeks the team will test the spacecraft’s antenna and repoint it toward Earth; upload commands into the onboard Guidance and Control and Command and Data Handling systems, including a check on the backup inertial measurement unit and update of the spacecraft’s navigational star charts; and conduct some navigational tracking, among other routine maintenance duties.

Distant-encounter operations begin Jan. 12, 2015.

“The future has finally arrived,” says New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern, of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. “After all the time and miles in the rearview mirror, the turning of the calendar page last week to 2014 means we’ll be exploring the Pluto system next year!”

Learn more on the New Horizons website here.

Timeline of the New Horizons mission. Download a large version here. (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)

Timeline of the New Horizons mission. Download a large version here. (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute)

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About Jason Major

Jason is a Rhode Island-based graphic designer, photographer, nature lover, space exploration fanatic, and coffee addict. In no particular order.

Posted on January 30, 2014, in Pluto, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Very good report on New Horizons.
    Jeff Barani from Vence (France)

    Like

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