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Category Archives: Features

Voyager 1’s Famous Long-Distance Valentine

Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune as seen by Voyager 1 in 1990 (Credit: NASA)

If you’re in love with space then you’ll fall head over heels for this: it’s a picture of Earth taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft after it passed the orbit of Pluto back in 1990—on Valentine’s Day, no less. That image of our planet from almost 4 billion miles away inspired Carl Sagan to write his famous “Pale Blue Dot” passage, which reminds us that we are all just riding on “a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

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Space Geek Gift Alert: The Year in Space 2017 Calendar!

If The Year in Space calendar were any more densely packed with information it would become a black hole. And try hanging one of those on your wall.

If The Year in Space calendar were any more densely packed with information it would become a black hole. (Don’t try hanging one of those on your wall!)

What brings you an entire sidereal year of awesome space facts and pictures, each and every day? That’s right: The Year in Space calendar! And it makes a super great gift for the space fan in your life (especially if it’s yourself.) Find out how to order below.

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NASA Sets Sail to Study Ocean and Climate

The research vessel Atlantis departing its port at Woods Hole, MA on May 11, 2016. © Jason Major

The research vessel Atlantis departing its port at Woods Hole, MA on May 11, 2016. © Jason Major

NASA has launched on another mission of exploration, except this time it wasn’t on a rocket ship from Cape Canaveral but rather on a research ship from Cape Cod.

NASA’s North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study—aka NAAMES—is a five-year-long investigation to resolve key processes controlling ocean system function, their influences on atmospheric aerosols and clouds and their implications for climate. The second month-long NAAMES cruise aboard the R/V Atlantis set sail from the ship’s harbor in Woods Hole, Massachusetts a little after 3:00 p.m. EDT on May 11, 2016, headed for target sites in the North Atlantic off the coast of Greenland and Nova Scotia.

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Pale Blue Dot: Our Valentine from Voyager 1

If you’re in love with space exploration then you’ll fall for this: a picture of Earth (and five other planets) taken from the Voyager 1 spacecraft after it passed the orbit of Pluto in 1990, 26 years ago today. That image of our planet from almost 4 billion miles away inspired Carl Sagan to write his famous “Pale Blue Dot” passage, and reminds us that we are all just floating on “a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”

This is from a post I originally published in 2010. I’ll keep trotting it out until it’s not cool anymore. (Which I don’t think will ever will NEVER happen.)

Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune as seen by Voyager 1 in 1990 (Credit: NASA)

On February 14, 1990, after nearly 13 years of traveling the solar system, the Voyager 1 spacecraft passed the orbit of Pluto and turned its camera around to take a series of photos of the planets. The image above shows those photos, isolated from the original series and are left to right, top to bottom: Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

From that distance, over 4 billion miles from the Sun, the planets each appear as little more than a bright dot against the vastness of interplanetary space.

“That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. … There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world.”

– Carl Sagan

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Scientists Prove It’s Still Einstein’s Universe and We’re All Just Living In It

Ripples in space-time from merging black holes have been detected for the first time in history (LIGO/Caltech/NSF)

The ripples in space-time from two merging black holes have been detected for the first time in history (Illustration LIGO/Caltech/NSF)

In what has truly turned out to be a momentous occasion in astrophysics, today scientists announced the first-ever direct observation of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) experiment, which consists of two enormous detector facilities located in Louisiana and Washington state and an international consortium of thousands of researchers.

First predicted by Albert Einstein in 1915, gravitational waves are the “ripples” in the fabric of space-time created by exceptionally turbulent and powerful cosmic events. Physicists have accepted their existence for decades and in recent years have even observed their effects, but only with the incredible sensitivity of the NSF-funded advanced LIGO instrument has their direct detection been made possible.

“This was truly a scientific moon shot, and we did it. We landed on the moon.”
– David Reitze, Executive Director of LIGO

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It’s Officially 2016 and Officially Time for a New Calendar

These are the calendars you're looking for.

These are the calendars you’re looking for.

If you just looked at your calendar and realized you’re literally out of days (Happy New Year!) then it’s way past time to get yourself a new one. And if you love space, these are the ones you’ll want.

Produced by Starry Messenger Press in conjunction with The Planetary Society, the 2016 Year in Space calendar is (like its predecessors) a gorgeous 16″ x 22″ (40.5 cm x 56 cm) work of art filled with over 120 images of space exploration and hundreds upon hundreds of bits of information about everything space. Sure it tells you what date it is like any other calendar, but no other calendar I know gives you so much great information about cosmic objects, astronauts and scientists, worlds of our solar system, and daily space exploration history. If you love space then you owe it to yourself to get one of these on your wall NOW. (I just put mine up and instantly learned that Ceres was discovered on this day in 1801!)

And, because Lights in the Dark has your back (and its illustrious author is not only mentioned on the inside front cover but this year was also responsible for writing all of the 53 photo descriptions on the desk version) you can get a discount by mentioning that you saw it on the internet. Order details are below:
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